The "What The Heck Should I Do With It" Thread

barrosinc

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Carve the left hand side away leaving a single trunk tree with loads of taper, take the carving up the trunk hollowing it out (stain it black inside) twist and turn the hollow trunk slightly to the left .

I think the azalea wood rots easy...
 

0soyoung

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I think the azalea wood rots easy...
The sensible thing to do would be to cut off the dead section, but meanwhile you could experiment with carving it into a jin and also toy with wood hardeners. Possibly you make something very interesting from it. If not, then cut it off.

Also, the plant should get stronger/healthier with another season or two of being left to grow. So, within a couple of years you could also chop it and restart the whole project, knowing what you don't know now. :)
 

Dav4

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I think the azalea wood rots easy...
The longer the deadwood stays, the more likely that rot will extend into the base of the tree. Personally, I'd chop/carve this one back to live cambium, seal the chop well, then let grow uninhibited for several years with the hope of healing up the chop.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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@barrosinc - I'm afraid @Dav4 is right, deadwood on azalea is a route for rot problems to eventually do in the whole tree.

I did have an azalea that had a dead jin, that eventually rotted through to the back side of the cambium of the living part of the trunk. The living vein did make bark all the way around, but it had a weird, narrow trunk that couldn't quite hold the tree up. But the roots continued to rot, it died a couple years later. All BDP, before cheap digital photography.
 
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Did you ever treat the dead wood ? Thought wood anti fungals, the kind of treatment for outside wood might help?
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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I did use wood hardener on the azalea I mentioned. The rot continued behind the treated wood, sometime later a chunk of hardened wood fell out of the trunk. Wood hardener might work "permanently" if you clean absolutely all rot sources out first. If, as in my case, you didn't do a good clean up before treatment, the wood hardener will buy you several years, but the rot will quietly continue. Sure, go ahead and use it. If the tree grows vigorous enough, it might get ahead of the issue. I would use it again.
 

defra

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This is a big hibiscus syriacus i dug out of my garden in spring 2016

Leaves have fallen and im now wondering how i should continue
i do have some toughts but id like to go trough all options so if anyone here has any idea please share your toughts

As you can see in the last pic there the side that is without branches that side is dead
Below that side in the soil there's a big wound

Here some pics:
20171029_093239.jpg 20171029_093211.jpg 20171029_093123.jpg 20171103_164147.jpg

Full story of this tree :
https://bonsainut.com/threads/hibiscus-syriacus.24818/
 

Jason

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How do you style a Dawn Redwood? How do you create ramification? Should the branches go up like a deciduous tree or droop down like an aging conifer? I’m not sure I’m digging this species for bonsai material. I got this one for free:

FE1435C7-DCA3-40F7-8395-CFB7CF5CD7E5.jpeg
 

Jason

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Research the way the tree looks in nature. That's a good place to start.
The only old growth ones only live in China and I can’t afford the plane ticket. There’s a few images on google. The branches seem to go up but most of the trees look young...I’m just confused as to how they would best be approached in a bonsai pot. How would you style yours?
 

Vin

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They are apical dominant. However, if you keep them somewhat shaded you can control it a little easier. I prefer drooping branches as they create an image of age. When left to their own habit they are telephone pole straight. Unlike say, Coast Redwood they back bud like crazy.
 

Vin

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The only old growth ones only live in China and I can’t afford the plane ticket. There’s a few images on google. The branches seem to go up but most of the trees look young...I’m just confused as to how they would best be approached in a bonsai pot. How would you style yours?
As far as the style goes, something like this crude virt is the direction I would be heading with it.

Dawn Redwood 3.2.jpg
 

Jason

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As far as the style goes, something like this crude virt is the direction I would be heading with it.

Thanks thats helpful. I finally found a picture of an excellent bonsai specimen online and that's exactly what they did.
 

milehigh_7

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So I have this gmelina philippensis (parrot's beak) that has a crazy knee. I think I know what I'm gonna do with it but what do you all think?

IMG_20180615_205734299.jpgIMG_20180615_205720008.jpg
 

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