Too much snow???

buddhamonk

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never had a winter like this in Portland...I moved the maples indoors but didn't have room for the other trees. I thought they'd be safe under the deck but I was wrong.

among these...which should I bring inside?

Shimpaku

Pine

Kingsville boxwood

Cotoneaster

spruce

Also - are the trees safer buried under the snow or should I dig them out???



















 

Graydon

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Being from Florida (actually South Dakota - but I have forgotten that period of time) I can't offer any advice. I would like to say thanks for the beautiful photos. We never see snow and I can't tell you how refreshing it was to see shots of bonsai covered in snow. Thanks for making my winter seem more like winter!
 

ghues

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Too much?

Hello Buddhamonk.
Global warming.......you are experiencing a Canadian winter HEY!,
I’ve been told that a thick blanket of snow over the trees is fine, especially for potection from the cold winds that can accompany these winter conditions.
Your spruce and pine should be fine, don’t have any experience with Shimpaku or cotoneaster but I’d further protect the K. boxwood especially if it’s small.
The weatherman is calling for more snow for us tonight and over the next few days…here is a shot from Sunday night.
Merry Chistmas
P.S looks like you need a Mountain Hemlock for your collection.
 

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Mojosan

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...among these...which should I bring inside?

None.

They can handle temps in the 20's, and a little snow won't hurt them either. You might want to cover the boxwood or place in a large box filled/covered with mulch. I'd just throw a tarp over 'em right where they are, and leave them alone till spring.

You may want to take those maples out of the house. Do you have an unheated garage or shed?

All of my pines and junis are happily buried under 3 feet of snow, and I expect them to be fine even as our temps are hovering around -6F
 
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Advice from Michigan, zone 5/6....


Shovel more snow on the trees.


Snow is an excellent insulator and on the warmer days it melts, watering for you. Here I just protect my trees from the north and west winds, leave them on the ground, and I make sure they are always covered with snow. Part of my snow removal routine involves shoveling snow onto the bonsai, so that at least the pots are always buried. This is all I do, no burying pots, not mulch, just tightly packed bonsai, on the ground, with plenty of snow.




Will
 

JasonG

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I have some of my shohin in the garage, only the expensive ones in expensive pots. Everything else, maples, pine, fir, hemlock, accent plants, grass, ect.... is out in the snow and ice.

These are trees, the snow and ice won't hurt them......if it is an outdoor tree that is...

Jason
 

reddog

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Most of mine are under benches with a tarp thrown on top (mostly conifers) the snow is acting as an insulation layer on top of the tarp. Shohin are in unheated garage (around 30 to 38 degrees), trees in the process of being layered, pomogranite, one and two year seedlings, and azaleas are in an unheated shed. I have thermometer in shed and its been holding around 26 to 29 degrees.
 

Bonsai Nut

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Snow is good - freezing wind on exposed trees is bad.

I agree with Will. Trees will do better under a heavy layer of snow than if exposed to cold, dry wind. In Chicago people would build cold frames against the lee side of their houses and fill them with snow. Bonsai would survive -20 temperatures no problem.
 

bonsai barry

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I have some of my shohin in the garage, only the expensive ones in expensive pots. Everything else, maples, pine, fir, hemlock, accent plants, grass, ect.... is out in the snow and ice.

These are trees, the snow and ice won't hurt them......if it is an outdoor tree that is...

Jason
Yes, they're trees but unlike native trees, their roots are in a pot, doesn't that change the equation?

Just asking, since it rarely drops below freezing on the Central Coast of CA.
 

JasonG

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Yes, they're trees but unlike native trees, their roots are in a pot, doesn't that change the equation?

Just asking, since it rarely drops below freezing on the Central Coast of CA.
Hey Barry,

Yeah, it kinda changes it a bit depending on species. Ponderosa Pine and most pines that are native to America, RMJ and most native junipers, firs, spruce, hemlock, need to be frozen. If a ponderosa or rmj go a few years without a solid freeze it will loose strength. These trees need a true dormant period. On the mountain thier root ball freezes solid every year anyways.
Maples, beech, hornbeam, larch, and other decidous trees are have always been fine when the rootballs freeze solid. I have never protected a tree from freezing temps, freezing rain, snow, sleet, etc and all my trees remain healthy.

When it comes to this weather what worries me most is cracking a pot. If we get a few days of good rain then a good freeze the rot pad will expand and could crack a pot.

But, if I lived in Chicago or the NE I am sure it would be a different story, but this is what works with the trees I work with in my climate. If I have to protect a tree and worry about it dying then I simply don't want it in my collection. Trees are much tougher than most give them credit for and can survive much tougher conditions then we think they can.

Jason
 

buddhamonk

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Thanks for all the responses...

The maples are in the garage and the rest are still buried in the snow. What was worrying was the thick layer of freezing rain we had with more snow on top of that. Temps got down to the low teens for a couple days and the wind was a bit harsh. I'm sure they'll be fine. I was more worried about the boxwoods than the conifers.
 
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