Tourniquet method?

Redwood Ryan

Masterpiece
Messages
4,421
Reaction score
2,302
Location
Virginia
USDA Zone
7A
Hey all,

I had a few questions about the method of wrapping wire around the base of a trunk to create new nebari/fix reverse taper. Can it be done any time on a tropical? How deep does the wire have to cut in? Just enough to interrupt the growth of the trunk? Here is the tree in question, showing awful reverse taper:

I would like to do this around the red line (note, this is an older picture, tree is more in leaf now):
 
Last edited:

Smoke

Ignore-Amus
Messages
11,563
Reaction score
19,746
Location
Fresno, CA
USDA Zone
9
So thats how sausages grow?


Make a groove for the wire and put the wire in the groove, (tight fitting) flush with the bark. Or you can just wrap the wire around a twist very tight. It will just take longer that way. The groove is faster since it won't issue roots till the cambium is interrupted. Might as well save time and make the goove for it.
 

Redwood Ryan

Masterpiece
Messages
4,421
Reaction score
2,302
Location
Virginia
USDA Zone
7A
Thought I answered this, oops.

Yes, this is indeed how sausages grow :D

Thank you! What if I just cut the bark off the trunk, then buried the exposed section below soil? Would it root that way? I think this would make a cool Baobab style tree. I just need to work on flattening the top. Thanks!
 

bretts

Shohin
Messages
273
Reaction score
2
One thing I have discovered about the Tourniquet method is that it is a great simple method when you have lots of trees that need the fix. But you will get better faster results if you take the time to set up a ground layer instead.
 

GerhardG

Mame
Messages
212
Reaction score
3
Location
Rosh Pinah, Namibia
USDA Zone
9b
hmmmmm

I tried this method on a Ficus B 'natascha" because it had a good base & roots, but there was a tap root going down 1" and then some more roots.

The tree suffered a scale insect attack, and when that was cured the tree just kept struggling,

One day I noticed something right at the base of the tree - some copper wire.
My only conclusion was I'd planted it too shallow, so the tree was slowly being choked off from it's roots, while there was nowhere for the top roots to really develop.

I guess that's my only advice then - plant it deep enough, the method works.

Rgds
Gerhard
 

Redwood Ryan

Masterpiece
Messages
4,421
Reaction score
2,302
Location
Virginia
USDA Zone
7A
One thing I have discovered about the Tourniquet method is that it is a great simple method when you have lots of trees that need the fix. But you will get better faster results if you take the time to set up a ground layer instead.

Could you explain how you would set up for the ground layring method? I may go that way instead.

I tried this method on a Ficus B 'natascha" because it had a good base & roots, but there was a tap root going down 1" and then some more roots.

The tree suffered a scale insect attack, and when that was cured the tree just kept struggling,

One day I noticed something right at the base of the tree - some copper wire.
My only conclusion was I'd planted it too shallow, so the tree was slowly being choked off from it's roots, while there was nowhere for the top roots to really develop.

I guess that's my only advice then - plant it deep enough, the method works.

Rgds
Gerhard

Sorry to hear that, was it a nice tree?
 

GerhardG

Mame
Messages
212
Reaction score
3
Location
Rosh Pinah, Namibia
USDA Zone
9b
Ryan,

I'm too young in this game to have nice trees......

.....and the tree isn't dead yet!:cool:

I ripped it out that very same afternoon (about a month ago?), got rid of the wire and put root hormone on the resulant wound. I want it to get strong first, then I'll tackle the roots again.

BTW I had no hope for this plant when I got it, used it for cuttings since this is the one and only small-leafed Ficus B. I've found in local nurseries.
Then something happened - after cutting enough off I saw something in the tree worth doing.

It's now on it's way to a problematic formal upright.
It's got 2 good low branches, no branches for just less than 1/3 of the trunk, and then more good branching.
My efforts at grafting failed, so I'll carry on with this tree as is, faults and all.
 

bretts

Shohin
Messages
273
Reaction score
2
Looks like Kevin explains standard ground layering as in pulling a branch down to the ground but not the Bonsai replace the root base ground layering that I was suggesting which is a pity Kevin explains things well.
I think that technique needs a new name besides ground layering :rolleyes:
Maybe base air layering:confused:
 

Similar threads

Top