Wire bite - how bad is it?

DonovanC

Chumono
Messages
524
Reaction score
594
Location
Ohio, U.S.
USDA Zone
6a
I picked up this juniper last fall, it was already wired. I planned to take the wire off this spring but I never got around to it.
How bad is this bite? Is it ok to wait until next spring? How would you proceed?22D6CADB-FCEE-45D4-84E0-45449CBE0F7C.jpeg5394A916-ACC4-416A-9608-02513600D9A0.jpegC76A0CA4-419B-4140-B27F-5D83AD79249D.jpeg54E4646C-86AE-4D91-A847-9515D5BE0087.jpeg
 

Paradox

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
6,627
Reaction score
7,373
Location
Long Island, NY
USDA Zone
7a
It's in pretty good on some spots. I would remove it now and rewire in a couple of months trying to wrap it in different spots
 

Paradox

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
6,627
Reaction score
7,373
Location
Long Island, NY
USDA Zone
7a
@DonovanC
Another thing I see is that you have large guage wire overlaying smaller guage.

This can lead to issues with biting in as well. The thicker wire puts pressure on the thinner one underneath.

It's always best to start with the heavier guage first and go to lesser thickness of wire as you wire out the tree. So as needed, do trunks first then lower branches nearest the trunk which are usually the thickest and move both up the tree and out further on the branches as you go
 

Jiminsauga

Yamadori
Messages
98
Reaction score
152
Location
Ontario, 🇨🇦
USDA Zone
5a
I'll also add that when you do rewire it, rewire it in the same clockwise or cc direction as before. Because of the deeper bite groves, if you rewire it opposing the previous grooves you will sever the remaining live vain and kill that branch. ask me how I know...

As Paradox has said above, put the new wire on different areas of the branches, not back in the old grooves.
 

ShimpakuBonsai

Yamadori
Messages
75
Reaction score
129
Location
Netherlands
USDA Zone
8B
I would take it off immediately because it is biting in excessively on several places and waiting till spring will make it even worse.

But you can also leave it on because some people like the character it gets from wire biting in
 

Dav4

Drop Branch Murphy
Messages
11,587
Reaction score
23,126
Location
North Georgia/lived in MA/moving to MI
USDA Zone
6a
I'll also add that when you do rewire it, rewire it in the same clockwise or cc direction as before. Because of the deeper bite groves, if you rewire it opposing the previous grooves you will sever the remaining live vain and kill that branch. ask me how I know...

As Paradox has said above, put the new wire on different areas of the branches, not back in the old grooves.
Actually, you should rewire in the opposite direction to the existing wire scars… Just don’t let the wire bite in to the point that it’s compromised the cambium
 

DonovanC

Chumono
Messages
524
Reaction score
594
Location
Ohio, U.S.
USDA Zone
6a
@DonovanC
Another thing I see is that you have large guage wire overlaying smaller guage.

This can lead to issues with biting in as well. The thicker wire puts pressure on the thinner one underneath.

It's always best to start with the heavier guage first and go to lesser thickness of wire as you wire out the tree. So as needed, do trunks first then lower branches nearest the trunk which are usually the thickest and move both up the tree and out further on the branches as you go
That’s a good point, the wire was actually on the tree when I purchased it. I just removed it 😬 hopefully I was gentle enough. There were places that were even worse than the parts shown in the pictures.
 

DonovanC

Chumono
Messages
524
Reaction score
594
Location
Ohio, U.S.
USDA Zone
6a
I would take it off immediately because it is biting in excessively on several places and waiting till spring will make it even worse.

But you can also leave it on because some people like the character it gets from wire biting in
I thought about leaving it on - but this is intended as a mother tree to get cuttings and air-layers a from and I didn’t want wires to interfere with any of that.
 

Dav4

Drop Branch Murphy
Messages
11,587
Reaction score
23,126
Location
North Georgia/lived in MA/moving to MI
USDA Zone
6a
I thought about leaving it on - but this is intended as a mother tree to get cuttings and air-layers a from and I didn’t want wires to interfere with any of that.
Those wire scars are significant now and will get worse if you were to leave untouched till spring. Getting them off now will allow a little bit of healing prior to dormancy. In a few years you’ll hardly notice them if you act now :)
 

DonovanC

Chumono
Messages
524
Reaction score
594
Location
Ohio, U.S.
USDA Zone
6a
Those wire scars are significant now and will get worse if you were to leave untouched till spring. Getting them off now will allow a little bit of healing prior to dormancy. In a few years you’ll hardly notice them if you act now :)
The wire is off now, I did it like 15 minutes ago. The bite was really deep in some spots - deeper than I thought. But it’s done - and the cambium doesn’t appear to be damaged at all.
 

Paradox

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
6,627
Reaction score
7,373
Location
Long Island, NY
USDA Zone
7a
The wire is off now, I did it like 15 minutes ago. The bite was really deep in some spots - deeper than I thought. But it’s done - and the cambium doesn’t appear to be damaged at all.

The tree will heal the scars. Might take a while but it will happen.
 

Vin

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
5,232
Reaction score
7,536
Location
Panama City, FL Zone 9a/8b Centr
USDA Zone
8b
I'll also add that when you do rewire it, rewire it in the same clockwise or cc direction as before. Because of the deeper bite groves, if you rewire it opposing the previous grooves you will sever the remaining live vain and kill that branch. ask me how I know...

As Paradox has said above, put the new wire on different areas of the branches, not back in the old grooves.
Now wait just a minute. Don't go making sense around here; you'll confuse everyone. ;)
 

Potawatomi13

Masterpiece
Messages
4,406
Reaction score
3,001
Location
Eugene, OR
USDA Zone
8
As much bite as is present branches should now be "set" in wired position and not need wired again. Scars will fill in/heal.
 

leatherback

The Treedeemer
Messages
10,754
Reaction score
18,281
Location
Northern Germany
USDA Zone
7
Junipers are thick-barked. The damage to the bark will heal and will virtually diappear
 

Arnold

Mame
Messages
215
Reaction score
296
Location
Canary Islands, Spain
Some people leave the wire almost tottally eated by the branch and then jin it, it makes a cool spiraling efect within the dead wood
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom