A Pine seldom seen.

Messages
279
Likes
193
Location
Salt Lake City, UT
USDA Zone
6a
#42
Collected in Utah this summer. Hard to see all the character in this photo but it's all I've got right now, and not sure why it uploaded sideways (sorry) but here it is.

View attachment 43101

Yes, collected in summer. And it's doing very well so far. It's in a 5 gallon bucket at the moment, so that gives some idea of scale - it's pretty large at the base. I'd like to learn more, because I really don't want to mess it up, this has potential to be a great tree.
Since I'm in Utah, I have a couple questions... if you don't mind. Where was the tree collected and when in the summer? I haven't done a lot of collecting in state yet, so I'm just trying to gauge what the climate was doing at the time you collected (so I'm not looking for an exact location, but elevations, rough geographic areas, etc.). Had the buds opened yet when you collected? Anything special about the soil/location it was collected from (rock pocket, etc.)?

I know members of the local club have done some collecting in the past, but it seems to have mostly been junipers. I have access to really nice areas in Wyoming and around the north rim of the Grand Canyon, and know of places in state where permits are available. Most of my collecting experience is from my days living in Virginia. Pretty different experience than what I have here.

I'm open to hearing your experiences.

Thanks,
 
Messages
55
Likes
5
#43
Since I'm in Utah, I have a couple questions... if you don't mind. Where was the tree collected and when in the summer? I haven't done a lot of collecting in state yet, so I'm just trying to gauge what the climate was doing at the time you collected (so I'm not looking for an exact location, but elevations, rough geographic areas, etc.). Had the buds opened yet when you collected? Anything special about the soil/location it was collected from (rock pocket, etc.)?

I know members of the local club have done some collecting in the past, but it seems to have mostly been junipers. I have access to really nice areas in Wyoming and around the north rim of the Grand Canyon, and know of places in state where permits are available. Most of my collecting experience is from my days living in Virginia. Pretty different experience than what I have here.

I'm open to hearing your experiences.

Thanks,
Hey Christian,

The tree was collected during the first few weeks of June (can't remember the exact date of collection) up in the foothills in shaly soil. It was a trip caused by an unexpected death in the family and I hadn't planned on doing any collecting, so I wasn't super prepared, but decided to make lemonade as it were and have a go at it. This was the best tree and is doing the best after collection as well. I don't really have any expert tips for you, like I said, we just went for it. Probably not the best time of the year, but it worked out okay. If I remember correctly, the candles were just starting to extend, depending on tree and location.
 
Messages
698
Likes
1,387
Location
New Mexico, zone 6b
USDA Zone
6b
#44
Hey Christian,

The tree was collected during the first few weeks of June (can't remember the exact date of collection) up in the foothills in shaly soil. It was a trip caused by an unexpected death in the family and I hadn't planned on doing any collecting, so I wasn't super prepared, but decided to make lemonade as it were and have a go at it. This was the best tree and is doing the best after collection as well. I don't really have any expert tips for you, like I said, we just went for it. Probably not the best time of the year, but it worked out okay. If I remember correctly, the candles were just starting to extend, depending on tree and location.
At higher altitudes, I think early June is reasonable. What were the roots like?
 
Messages
12,115
Likes
12,308
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
5-6
#45
Thanks a lot guys, it's great to see this discussion going on about a native tree that I believe is the most ignored premium material in the world and-- in a location were so many complain that they have no material available locally for bonsai. Junipers are great and I have certainly seen many really good collected specimens on display and for sale at larger shows. Natives Pines of the same quality are as rare as hen's teeth. There are of course the ubiquitous Ponerosa Pines which I am not particularly fond of, the occasional Lodge Pole Pines that will need decades to develop, and the --------Zen Pine in need of identification, and discovery. I do not speak from experience but from what I have seen of the tree in the wild I believe the Pinion Pine may turn out to be the best bonsai potential tree on the Continent.

In case you have not noticed, I have become infatuated with this tree and its possibilities. I have included some more photos of it taken in the Grand Canyon.

DSC_2304.jpg
How can you not love the bark on this tree? I think the bark is every bit as good as that on the Ponderosa Pine.

DSC_2303.jpg DSC_2306.jpg How can you not love the way this tree grows? In many ways it looks a lot like Japanese White Pine except it is not a five needle Pine with associated problems that I am yet aware of.

Last but not least look at the condition of some of the Yamadori possible trees growing out there. I realize these are not collectable but there has to be many like them in areas that are.

DSC_2285.jpg DSC_2284.jpg
 
Last edited:
Messages
12,115
Likes
12,308
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
5-6
#47
I think they are very nice and look as though they could be removed from the ground rather easily. If you have access to these trees and you have access to a decent 35mm or digital camera could you get some close-up shots of the growth on the trees? I would like to compare them to what I found in the park.
 
Messages
698
Likes
1,387
Location
New Mexico, zone 6b
USDA Zone
6b
#48
I can't get to those today, but here are some from around my house - same species, P. edulis

IMG_4086.jpg IMG_4085.jpg

These cones didn't survive to maturity. They are less than an inch long, and would normally be green at this stage.

IMG_4112.jpg
 
Messages
12,115
Likes
12,308
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
5-6
#49
Messages
698
Likes
1,387
Location
New Mexico, zone 6b
USDA Zone
6b
#50
This one is about 4 feet tall.

IMG_4097.jpg IMG_4098.jpg IMG_4101.jpg


The blue needles are Summer buds that emerge directly from the branch, not from the Spring candles.

IMG_4099.jpg
 
Messages
599
Likes
7
Location
El Paso , TX
#52
I go to Albuquerque every so often for workshops and these folks seem to know a lot about pinons. They grow all around them. The range maps show they also grow down here close to Las Cruces but I havn't found any where I collect. I did have one that I got off e-bay and it did great until I left it out in sub 0 weather....stupid , stupid , stupid. It was starting to back bud like crazy just a few months before the idiot taking care of it killed it. The people I've talked to in NM seem to think it's an easy tree to work with.

BTW , Natures Way Nursery is supposed to have some for sale. Don't know what species.
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
Anthony General Discussion 11
M. Frary Pines 5
M. Frary Pines 12
S New to Bonsai 7
Shinjuku Pines 4

Similar threads