Are there examples of root over crystals?

RKMcGinnis

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I was curious if people have seen this or have photo’s of root over crystal?
 

19Mateo83

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I was curious if people have seen this or have photo’s of root over crystal?
I personally haven’t but that’s a killer idea! I got a quartz crystal that’s just begging for something big growing over it
 

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Mikecheck123

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I was curious if people have seen this or have photo’s of root over crystal?
There are examples of root over lots of random stuff.

Here's a statue.

 

RKMcGinnis

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Too flashy, in the same way a pot shouldn't be the focus of our attention, the rock/pot should compliment the tree not outshine it.
I definitely understand where you are coming from. A composition that exemplifies aspects of the tree is the most ideal and key. And I agree. I just don’t think under all circumstances it would be to flashy. I think it could compliment like a beech with the light colored bark and copper color leaves in fall and winter. I think using a crystal in the composition could be difficult but still possible. Crystals aren’t super vibrant they are just clear and white. And I mean a natural raw one not one cut. I also think that a the stone once wrapped in the roots of the tree become more one then the container does.
 

sorce

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I think it would be pretty cool to include a geode type Crystal rock in a landscape, where you can only see inside it if you bend down for a look.

Like so only kid heights can see it normally.

Sorce
 

Kanorin

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My 7 year old son really like collecting geodes/crystals and I suspect this might be a fun project to do with him combining our interests.

Will this be in line with the Japanese Bonsai aesthetic? Definitely not.
Will it still be fun/enjoyable/interesting? Yes
 

rockm

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Bottom line--for me---It's a gimmick. Simple as that. One trick pony no real introspection needed--"ooooo ahhh-a cryyystaalll...with a treeeee on it...."Move over lucky bamboo...theres a new tchotchke in town. 😁 o_O
 

Nybonsai12

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There are examples of root over lots of random stuff.

Here's a statue.


Im not a big fan of root over stuff style but love this tree by Lenz. If I remember correctly our own member Crust has some interesting and different compositions. I recall an old vacuum being used as a pot and thought that was cool.

i Have not seen a crystal utilized but am Interested to see how it might turn out. Different can be good and it’s interesting to see people try new things. Go for it!
 

BrianBay9

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I definitely understand where you are coming from. A composition that exemplifies aspects of the tree is the most ideal and key. And I agree. I just don’t think under all circumstances it would be to flashy. I think it could compliment like a beech with the light colored bark and copper color leaves in fall and winter. I think using a crystal in the composition could be difficult but still possible. Crystals aren’t super vibrant they are just clear and white. And I mean a natural raw one not one cut. I also think that a the stone once wrapped in the roots of the tree become more one then the container does.

Make one and post it for us! Don't let anyone discourage you from trying something you think you'd like.
 

ShadyStump

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Bottom line--for me---It's a gimmick. Simple as that. One trick pony no real introspection needed--"ooooo ahhh-a cryyystaalll...with a treeeee on it...."Move over lucky bamboo...theres a new tchotchke in town. 😁 o_O
I won't argue, but I do think there are ways to incorporate CERTAIN crystals into CERTAIN styles effectively.
Example I have some large chunks of quartzite I've collected in the past that are a simple soft, vaguely translucent white with inclusions of different sorts, some black streaks of iron, others red chunks of granite, etc. White crystal in a white pot, with the right tree could be rather complimentary. I can actually see someone very effectively creating a snowy mountain appearance with a conifer.

Generally, though, I agree that it's rather kitschy to just throw in something shiny for the hell of it.
But if we're honest with ourselves, we do all enjoy a bit of kitsch once in a while.
 

rockm

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If you're talking about quartz crystals (white, flat sides, etc) they are mostly boring. On the practical side, their flat sides offer nowhere to allow roots to hold onto. The tree probably isn't going to stay put on one very easily...
 

ShadyStump

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Similar composition, but not a solid crystal. I don't recall the actual mineral name, but they're a dime a dozen around here. I'll try to find a pic if I can.
 

LittleDingus

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Crystals are too smooth for roots to adhere to. Best you could hope for is to do something like braid the roots around the crystal so they trap it.

However, if the crystal is in a porous matrix, the roots can adhere to the matrix readily. This is one of my 2 root-over-geode gimmicks.

20220211_165749.jpg

There's a thread on this one and it's "twin" here


Both have adhered to the geode outer matrix readily. I could have done a better job of managing the root placements, but I'm happy enough with them for now. This tree hasn't defoliated indoors for the winter as it had done last season. It's got a lot more root this year and is a much happier tree.

It moves from a very bright house in KC (zone 6) to a house with less favorable exposures in Chicago (zone 5) in 2 weeks. It'll maybe defoliate a bit after that move. Regardless, come May much of that canopy will likely go and I'll start working more on setting secondary branches.
 

ShadyStump

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These are examples of the sort of rocks/crystals I mentioned before.

IMG_20220211_164628_684.jpg
They're not crystals per se, but they're made up of myriad tiny bits of a quartz type mineral. Quite porous, and usually with inclusions like you see here. Like I said, dime a dozen in these parts, but I have seen specimens of very surprising clarity.

Something like this, or as sorce suggested a literal hidden gem in the details only visible upon inspection, I think would be entirely appropriate.
 

19Mateo83

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I have always heard of that referred to as milky quartz. Rose quarts may be interesting paired with something with red flowers
 

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LittleDingus

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These are examples of the sort of rocks/crystals I mentioned before.

View attachment 420067
They're not crystals per se, but they're made up of myriad tiny bits of a quartz type mineral. Quite porous, and usually with inclusions like you see here. Like I said, dime a dozen in these parts, but I have seen specimens of very surprising clarity.

Something like this, or as sorce suggested a literal hidden gem in the details only visible upon inspection, I think would be entirely appropriate.

Quartz is non-porus. That's actually what makes it superior to granite as counter top material...it doesn't need constant sealing :) By definition, quartz is a silicon dioxed mineral: basically glass.

The matrix the quartz is in may be porous. And in low grade quartz stone there may be cracks and inclusions for roots to grab...but it's quite possible that if roots enter those cracks that the stone will shear along the inclusion.

In geodes, the quartz is interior to a bubble of some matrix material. On my geode, the shell matrix is quite porous and roots adhere to it very readily readily. Unfortunately, that material is basically a highly compacted sand. My fear is that it will beak down and wash away over time and the roots will lose their grip :(

But, for now, it's a fun tree to play with :D
 

penumbra

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For me a crystal would completely throw off any meaningful sense of scale. A rock with tiny crystals might work well though.................
for me. I actually have a couple that I have had for decades that may find themselves in such a composition someday. And maybe not.
 

ShadyStump

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I have always heard of that referred to as milky quartz. Rose quarts may be interesting paired with something with red flowers
I think I've heard that term too, but I wish I could find for certain what the actual mineral name is, if only for conversations like this.
I have seen some like this that are speckled with actual rose quartz, as well as rose quartz that are the size of truck tires. None as deep red as your example. Always a soft pink when they're that size.

I do think @penumbra is right about the scale illusion, though. Crystals would be fun, but forever kitsch.
 

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