Question on Cut Paste Application

Apex37

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I've seen where some people apply cut paste around the edge of the wound of the cut, but not across the entirety of the cut.

Is there really a benefit one way over the other?

My thought was maybe because that's really the only portion that will roll to callus that maybe it helped slowing down callusing by allowing the center of the cut to be exposed to air, but not sure. I'd love any insight so I can learn!
 

HorseloverFat

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One is paste... one is putty.

4BAD2B00-F425-4C8D-BA2E-5B3EBB91CDB6.jpeg

The immediate goal is to keep CLEAN and SEALED...

Your tree will have NO problem "moving" the wound paste/putty when it needs to "roll over"

...I think. ;)
 

Apex37

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One is paste... one is putty.

View attachment 433927

The immediate goal is to keep CLEAN and SEALED...

Your tree will have NO problem "moving" the wound paste/putty when it needs to "roll over"

...I think. ;)
I realized I should have probably been more specific. I meant putty.
Some people I'll see put putty on the entire cut and others just put around the edge of the cut and was curious as to the differences (if there is any) between doing one way or the other.
 

HorseloverFat

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I realized I should have probably been more specific. I meant putty.
Some people I'll see put putty on the entire cut and others just put around the edge of the cut and was curious as to the differences (if there is any) between doing one way or the other.
Hmm...

I have seen different amounts of "edge coverage"... I think it HAS to, almost be a personal preference thing.

It also could directly related to the SIZE of the wound... more paste around the edges would "stay" on longer... but not much... not enough to MATTER, one would think.

Interesting inquiry..

My vote is "personal preference".. but CAN'T WAIT to hear what others have to say.

🤓
 

Dav4

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If the wound in question is small enough that it might heal in a growing season or two, I'd cover it entirely. If the wound is large enough that it will take 3-4 + years to callus over, I'd only cover the edges, generously, as the main benefit of the putty is to keep the callus moist to assist callus formation. I've found that putty covering lots of exposed wood can unfortunately contribute to the onset of rot and it's better, imo, to leave that wood open and hopefully dry.
 

HorseloverFat

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. If the wound is large enough that it will take 3-4 + years to callus over, I'd only cover the edges, generously, as the main benefit of the putty is to keep the callus moist to assist callus formation.

COOL!!
 

rockm

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I realized I should have probably been more specific. I meant putty.
Some people I'll see put putty on the entire cut and others just put around the edge of the cut and was curious as to the differences (if there is any) between doing one way or the other.
I tend to cover entire wounds if using the putty. A ring of putty around a core of dead interior wood can hold onto water, which can if left long enough or is constant enough can spur rot in some cases.
 

Bonsai Nut

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Depending on the tree species, the season, and the size of the wound, you may only want to cover the live edges of the wound - to allow the exposed deadwood to remain dry. A couple of times I have sealed the entirety of a large wound, and fluid has gathered behind the cut paste like a blister.
 

Apex37

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Same here! I had seen it and makes sense, it's been on the larger cuts I see people putting it just along the edge. Thank you all for chirping in.
 

dbonsaiw

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A couple of times I have sealed the entirety of a large wound, and fluid has gathered behind the cut paste like a blister.
I've experienced this on cut maples that didn't bleed right away excessively. The paste was able to stay on long enough to stick and when the bleeding started I had blisters. Is this an issue? I've popped the blisters before to let the water out, but I don't do this religiously at all.

Does sealing the entirety of the wound help in preventing die back or is that only applicable to the outside ring as well?
 

Bonsai Nut

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I've experienced this on cut maples that didn't bleed right away excessively. The paste was able to stay on long enough to stick and when the bleeding started I had blisters. Is this an issue? I've popped the blisters before to let the water out, but I don't do this religiously at all.

Does sealing the entirety of the wound help in preventing die back or is that only applicable to the outside ring as well?
In the one particular case I remember, it was with an Oriental Sweetgum. Initially I cut a hole in the paste to drain the water/sap, but when I removed the cut paste, there was visible fungus in the deadwood. I let the wound dry, and treated it with lime sulfur, and fortunately I did not see any lasting negative impact. However given how hot and dry Southern California is, you almost have to TRY to grow fungus on deadwood... unless you keep it always wet.

With your second question, we need to be more specific. If the pruning wound is down to deadwood, sealing deadwood does nothing... it is dead. However if you are dealing with branches or shallower cuts into sapwood, I would generally seal the entire wound. After all, you are dealing with cuts into (but not through) vascular tissue. If left exposed to air, it will die. If you seal it, it may not die, or there is a chance that the tree will get a jump start on callousing over the wound.
 

Shibui

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Interesting that some have seen rot as a result of sealing while others seal to prevent rot.
I'm certainly in the seal to prevent rot camp. Lots of unsealed scars here have started to rot the dead wood near the centre while cuts sealed right after making the cuts stay solid for years longer.
I guess if the heart wood is already infected sealing would provide better conditions for growth but if there's no existing infection an effective sealer should keep out fungal spores and thus prevent rot. Leaving the wood exposed will certainly allow any spores in the air to settle and if conditions are suitable they'll grow. Unfortunately when we water regularly that can make even naturally hostile environments suitable for wood rotting fungi.
I've also used lime sulfur to prevent and stop rot if the cut starts to look soft.
 

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