What did you buy at the Convention?

Smoke

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I bought some pots and some plants...

some tools and some stones.

First pot is a signature Yamaki shohin pot.

the second is a Chinese Yixing ware pot. I just liked the shape of the second.

The last two are Korean pots from Tongre. the largest is 23x17x7
and the second is 20x15x5. California juniper for one and possibly the myrtle in the big one if the glazed pot does not work I have already for it.
 

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Smoke

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I bought these two stones because one...I liked them

and two...both had natural bottoms.

The big green one is about 9 inches high and about the same as a footprint. The smaller one is palm sized, the perfect size for suiseki.
 

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Smoke

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I bought three trees to work on this year. I told myself when I went "NO MORE JUNIPERS".
Well I managed to buy two junipers and a pine. Not much good diciduous stuff this year.

All three are about 8 inches tall and the pine and rough juniper have a 1.5 inch trunk while the Mas Iishi Kishu juniper is about 1 inch.
 

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Smoke

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I bought a few tools...nothing special. I managed to find a heavy duty scissor type wire cutter I been looking for and a good quality brass brush for cleaning jins. Found a sharp pointed Japanese draw type jin graver that I needed and some great old books from Jim Barrett that filled in my collection of "Bonsai in California".

So what did you all buy?
 

greerhw

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I bought these two stones because one...I liked them

and two...both had natural bottoms.

The big green one is about 9 inches high and about the same as a footprint. The smaller one is palm sized, the perfect size for suiseki.

My California stone, interesting, but I've shown it before.

keep it green,
Harry
 

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Nice pre-bonsai Al, who did the work on these, they look well cared for and shaped with a future in mind.


I like the pine the best out of the three, good buy.




Will
 

Yamadori

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Besides the most perfect margarita? Nothing exciting or extravagent, just practical stuff. A masakuni sprayer, a nozzle replacement for my Hawes watering can, 3 books about suiseki, and some lime sulfer.

My budget was tight. If it weren't for the Power of One scholarship program I wouldn't have made it at all.

I left with priceless knowledge, great companionship, and good memories. Things money can't buy.
 

Smoke

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Besides the most perfect margarita? Nothing exciting or extravagent, just practical stuff. A masakuni sprayer, a nozzle replacement for my Hawes watering can, 3 books about suiseki, and some lime sulfer.

My budget was tight. If it weren't for the Power of One scholarship program I wouldn't have made it at all.

I left with priceless knowledge, great companionship, and good memories. Things money can't buy.

We did share a Suiseki siminar together with Larry and Nina Ragle and that was probably the best treasure of all.

I know you went on a Rock collecting trip and I seen the stone you brought back. priceless treasure from the desert.
 

greerhw

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Like them of not, not for everyone, anything show up at the Convention like these ?

keep it green,
Harry
 

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Smoke

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Nice pre-bonsai Al, who did the work on these, they look well cared for and shaped with a future in mind.


I like the pine the best out of the three, good buy.




Will

The rough juniper and the pine are from George Muranaka. I will be going there in a few months to dig pines from the ground that are tagged.

The other juniper is from Mas Iishi
 

Smoke

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Like them of not, not for everyone, anything show up at the Convention like these ?

keep it green,
Harry

There used to be a Chinese seller of this type of stones that came to the conventions for about five years. They have not been back for about 5 or 6 years now. No one in California buys this stuff, out here we have a very traditional Japanese culture in the stone/bonsai arena. Most out here don't even like cut stones like yours from Ken McCloud in Cal.

It is pretty though....just cut.
( I have some cut stones too)
 
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I couldn't get myself to buy a cut stone... no idea why... I just want "found" ones... It may be the only traditionalist thing about me.

I bought a shohin Shimp... a bonsai cameo... a turquois bonsai pendant... some masakuni pliers (the really big useful kind)... a masakuni spray nozzel (to cheap not to try)... a Dick Ryerson "land and sea" accent pot (which I bought to pair up with a pinus contorta contorta bunjin I collected this year, should it live)... a spiffy leather tool roll... and Eric bought a large redwood from Mendecino bonsai.

One of the coolest things I got I won in the raffle... a particularly nice cascade table. (I'm told I squealed like a valley girl when I won it.) :p
 
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Attila Soos

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Like them of not, not for everyone, anything show up at the Convention like these ?

keep it green,
Harry

Interesting stones, I kind of like them, one can find similar ones at several Chinese-owned import-export dealerships in the Los Angeles area. The big problem that I have with them is that they look too pretty to be true. I can't help but think that these stones have been worked on, and significantly "enhanced" with various techniques (acid treatment, artificial coloring, subtle carving, cutting, and God knows what else). So, I just can't trust them anymore, and because of all these enhancements, they lose most of their value in my eye. What makes it even worse is that these dealers often lie to you and do not admit that the stones have been worked on, or they are not sure because they bought the stone second hand from China.

I am one of those who prefer stones that are certifiably untouched and uncut.
 
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Bonsai Nut

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Two different shimpaku twists from Mas and Gary Ishii. A Chinese Quince and an Ume from George Muranaka. A moss ball from Carol Upston. Three Sara Rayner pots from Bob Shimon. A few Chinese pots and some wire.

I was hoping Brad Coleman of Blue Oak Nursery was going to be there again this year. He had some great stock two years ago...
 

Ashbarns

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I couldn't get myself to buy a cut stone... no idea why... I just want "found" ones... It may be the only traditionalist thing about me.

Ms. Vic much applause from me on that. There is not much taste or tradition in cutting stones, it is a profit driven enterprise. As found and adapt the daiza is the way to go.

Ash :)
 

Bill S

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If I could have gone I would have bought things like you guys did. Nice finds Al, I am appreciating the rocks more and more lately, ooo-boy something else to learn and (don't tell the wife) spend money on. Although collecting sounds better, paying for rocks is something a lot of people would have a hard time justifying, especially the uninitiated.

Were the collecting trips successfull? That part of the convention was interesting as I read the registration materials. Hopefully I'll make it across and attend sooner than later.
 
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I couldn't get myself to buy a cut stone... no idea why... I just want "found" ones... It may be the only traditionalist thing about me.

Ms. Vic much applause from me on that. There is not much taste or tradition in cutting stones, it is a profit driven enterprise. As found and adapt the daiza is the way to go.

Ash :)

As much as the cut stones were going for... I'd have rather paid more for an uncut one. In for a penny, in for a pound I suppose. I even asked them why so many were cut, and it was explained to me that it's because the geologic history where many of the lovely stones was found, doesn't tend create that flatened ground down surface. To me that only makes natural stone that much more precious and worthy of collecting.

I have the same problem with diamonds... if it isn't perfect, why bother? Needless to say... I own no perfect diamonds. My hobbies make owning such a prize a very low priority. ;)

I have always been an all or nothing kind of girl. :D

Best regards as ever,

Victrinia
 
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