Wild Maple Soil Suggestions

Forest Bean

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I have posted about this maple this week. I collected it from the woods. I want to know peoples suggestions for soil once it stabilizes enough to be repotted.

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I don't know the specific species. I believe it is Acer Rubrum the Red Maple. Others have suggested the "Freeman" Maple hybrid and the Norway Maple.

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I don't have well draining soil on hand. I didn't want it drying out and dying so I filled it with very organic soil that is from an old wood burn pile. I know organic soil causes rotting on the chopped roots. Sadly it was better than the clay in the ground.

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Look at that curve! The base is 4 inches thick.

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Lets take a moment to imagine it once the deadwood has been carved out and hollowed. The top carved down to make better taper. And future new growth trained out.... in my mind it resembles an ancient tree from a mythical story. Whats your vision?

Okay, enough with the dreaming. Trees don't follow our dreams. Unless your the Lorax. What do you think the little orange mustached fellow would think of our bonsai efforts?
"I speak for the trees and they say 'Get your hands off of me!'"

So what is the best soil for wild maple? I plan on getting it in better soil around the end of summer, before Old Man Winter gets his icy grip on my tree.

"Get your hands off my tree, you dendrophilic pervert!"
 

A. Gorilla

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The idea is to put it right into coarse substrate outta the ground. You went through the trouble of hosing off the roots. Might want to do that right away. There is no such stabilization period as you call it in the short term.

Pumice or sifted perlite are viable. Perlite being common and ok as long as you sift it through a screen and don’t breathe it.

Have that on hand next time before you dig.

It’s not going to like being disturbed again this year.

You’re in a bit of a weird spot if you can’t do something in the very near future.
 
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Forest Bean

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The idea is to put it right into coarse substrate outta the ground. You went through the trouble of hosing off the roots. Might want to do that right away. There is no such stabilization period as you call it. It can take it. Red maples are vigorous.

Pumice or sifted perlite are viable.
I've always heard people say that when collecting a large tree, they need time because they have just been damaged and put into shock. Well, whenever I can get it into course substrate, I will.
 

A. Gorilla

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Once something is torn outta the ground it wants to be left alone, yes. For sure. For years, in fact. That’s why it goes right into coarse bonsai substrate immediately. Saves time and reduces stress on the tree.
 

Forest Bean

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Once something is torn outta the ground it wants to be left alone, yes. For sure. For years, in fact. That’s why it goes right into coarse bonsai substrate immediately. Saves time and reduces stress on the tree.
When I bring it back home or when I go shopping I'll check the nurseries and stores for pumice, perlite, lava rock, etc. Anything well draining, coarse and suitable for growing trees in.
 

shimbrypaku

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I agree it needs to be in a more coarse soil, I keep two bags of Perma Till in the garage all the times, its cheap and available in my area. You never know when you may need some, when a tree comes available from a landscape rip out.
 

M. Frary

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I've always heard people say that when collecting a large tree, they need time because they have just been damaged and put into shock. Well, whenever I can get it into course substrate, I will.
They're right.
But now you will need to shock it again.
Every time you repot you shock them.
You should be O.K. this year,just be careful of water retention,over moist soil.
Don't let it dry out but you may not need to water as much with the dirt it's in.
It's a red maple. Not My first pick but they're pretty tough.
 

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