Collected Redberry Juniper (Juniperus pinchotii)

jbogard

Mame
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I collected another juniper today that I believed was and Ashe juniper but on closer inspection I believe it is a redberry juniper. The foliage looks a bit different and the bark is definitely not as dark as Ashe juniper. If anyone can verify ID I would appreciate it! Either way it’s a great tree but it would be cool to have a species that is almost or completely non existent in bonsai.1E8344DE-DD65-42D5-87F4-7BD148461993.jpeg0263EC6E-8AA7-4829-A822-E0B05F12582E.jpegFCAE0DAB-9868-4A5C-9424-F6FE38E1AEBC.jpegA8F3EA07-1A93-48B9-B9E2-1921506E6432.jpeg0931CE3B-EF28-49D4-8525-CFB004911473.jpegF656B5E8-9347-465A-A8F2-FAFAE4237734.jpeg
 

Woocash

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I do enjoy your collecting adventures. I love how beaten up everything looks. When I go out looking I struggle to find trees that aren’t straight up and ridiculously vigorous, so forgive my ignorance, but given how different our climates are do you have many tree species that are just reach for the sky spears or manage to grow with any speed? All your examples seem to be slow growing, gnarly little beasties.
 

Stan Kengai

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That looks like a very nice trunk. Hope it does well for you.
 

jbogard

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I do enjoy your collecting adventures. I love how beaten up everything looks. When I go out looking I struggle to find trees that aren’t straight up and ridiculously vigorous, so forgive my ignorance, but given how different our climates are do you have many tree species that are just reach for the sky spears or manage to grow with any speed? All your examples seem to be slow growing, gnarly little beasties.
There are plenty of vigorous straight trees around but I guess I would say there are more gnarly trunks in this specific area than in most of my region. We don’t get a ton of rain so most of our trees aren't extremely large but there are fast growing straight trunk trees. Guess it’s deceiving because I don’t post pictures of those trees haha.
This is the landscape. It’s semi-arid and mostly oak and juniper in this picture.
 

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rockm

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Could be redberry juni. You're going to get a variety of answers here. Local county agent or wildlife expert can better tell for sure.

And for the Brits here ;-), Texas is a BIG place. Several different climates, from the subtropical swamp in the S.W, to the Piney woods in the East, to the desert out west, to Central Texas semi-arid savannah....Big fast growing trees are common in S.E and East Texas, bald cypress, live oak, elm, sweetgum are all common, The further west, the more arid it gets, mesquite, juniper, sagebrush, etc.
 

Woocash

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There are plenty of vigorous straight trees around but I guess I would say there are more gnarly trunks in this specific area than in most of my region. We don’t get a ton of rain so most of our trees aren't extremely large but there are fast growing straight trunk trees. Guess it’s deceiving because I don’t post pictures of those trees haha.
This is the landscape. It’s semi-arid and mostly oak and juniper in this picture.
Looks beautiful. Kinda like where my mum used to live in southern Spain. I can see why you’d manage to find some decent stock round there, I just wish I’d taken up bonsai before she moved back. There were so many funky holm oaks, olives and pines. I’ll be waiting for your next discovery and looking forward to your progress with these.
 

Michael P

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And for the Brits here ;-), Texas is a BIG place. Several different climates, from the subtropical swamp in the S.W, to the Piney woods in the East, to the desert out west, to Central Texas semi-arid savannah....Big fast growing trees are common in S.E and East Texas, bald cypress, live oak, elm, sweetgum are all common, The further west, the more arid it gets, mesquite, juniper, sagebrush, etc.
You forgot the high plains and short grass prairie of the Panhandle, and the tall grass prairie of the Blacklands.
 

Woocash

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Could be redberry juni. You're going to get a variety of answers here. Local county agent or wildlife expert can better tell for sure.

And for the Brits here ;-), Texas is a BIG place. Several different climates, from the subtropical swamp in the S.W, to the Piney woods in the East, to the desert out west, to Central Texas semi-arid savannah....Big fast growing trees are common in S.E and East Texas, bald cypress, live oak, elm, sweetgum are all common, The further west, the more arid it gets, mesquite, juniper, sagebrush, etc.
Ha! I probably sound like I’ve never stepped off our little island, but I forget just how big Texas is alone, so of course there’s going to be an abundance of different flora. I’ve never been to the US, but I am somewhat envious of the variation you guys have over there. One day I’ll get around to discovering some of it...
 

jbogard

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Looks beautiful. Kinda like where my mum used to live in southern Spain. I can see why you’d manage to find some decent stock round there, I just wish I’d taken up bonsai before she moved back. There were so many funky holm oaks, olives and pines. I’ll be waiting for your next discovery and looking forward to your progress with these.
I think it’s beautiful land as well! It’s a privilege to be able to have access to this land and the resources it has to offer. I hope I can do these trees justice and facilitate their advancement in the future. Here are some images of the feeder roots during the potting process
 

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rockm

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Could be redberry juni. You're going to get a variety of answers here. Local county agent or wildlife expert can better tell for sure.

And for the Brits here ;-), Texas is a BIG place. Several different climates, from the subtropical swamp in the S.W, to the Piney woods in the East, to the desert out west, to Central Texas semi-arid savannah....Big fast growing trees are common in S.E and East Texas, bald cypress, live oak, elm, sweetgum are all common, The further west, the more arid it gets, mesquite, juniper, sagebrush, etc.
BTW, should be SouthEAST Texas with BC.
 

rockm

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Ha! I probably sound like I’ve never stepped off our little island, but I forget just how big Texas is alone, so of course there’s going to be an abundance of different flora. I’ve never been to the US, but I am somewhat envious of the variation you guys have over there. One day I’ll get around to discovering some of it...
FWIW, you can fit the U.K. into Texas almost three times...Y'all should definitely visit. Great place and great people.
 

james76110

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It's my understanding that Ashe can create hybrids with virginianis and monosperma, it has the same reproduction cycle. But Pinchot has a different reproduction cycle, and therefore has no hybridization. I might be wrong. So if anyone has more insight, I welcome it.
 

chicago1980

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I collected another juniper today that I believed was and Ashe juniper but on closer inspection I believe it is a redberry juniper. The foliage looks a bit different and the bark is definitely not as dark as Ashe juniper. If anyone can verify ID I would appreciate it! Either way it’s a great tree but it would be cool to have a species that is almost or completely non existent in bonsai.View attachment 281637View attachment 281638View attachment 281639View attachment 281645View attachment 281646View attachment 281647
Looks like Ashe Juniper.
 

chicago1980

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If you see them side by side you can really see the difference. I’m quite confident it is redberry now. Here’s an example of the difference in foliage.
Juniperus pinchotii-redberry juniper
View attachment 295024View attachment 295025View attachment 295026

Ashe juniper- Juniperus ashei
View attachment 295027View attachment 295028View attachment 295029
Keep us up to date. I have 2 Ashe Junipers and enjoy them alot! Beautiful foliage color and different Deadwood due to the climate. Enjoy.
 

sorce

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If you see them side by side you can really see the difference. I’m quite confident it is redberry now. Here’s an example of the difference in foliage.
Juniperus pinchotii-redberry juniper
View attachment 295024View attachment 295025View attachment 295026

Ashe juniper- Juniperus ashei
View attachment 295027View attachment 295028View attachment 295029
Only thing Ashei in that picture is that hand!
Lol. Bill Burr .."I'm Ashy!"

Sorce
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Took me 2 days to drive from Saint Louis Missouri to Houston Texas, driving over 10 hours each day. It is one big state. 1270 kilometers east-west and 1244 kilometers north-south. Elevation from sea level to 2677 meters (8750 feet at Guadalupe Peak). And the language, they all call it English, is almost unintelligible from the East Texas to far West Texas. East Texas has the Cajun influence, West Texas is influenced by the Tex-Mex dialect of Spanish. And then you have all them damn liberal northerners retiring to areas like Houston, Dallas, and especially the Hill Country north of San Antonio. Almost enough northerners to make those areas vote Blue. Almost, but not quite, at least as of 2016.

I love the food, Houston was a culinary delight, much like dining in New Orleans, except when we hit a Mexican restaurant, the quality was better than the Mexican restaurants I encountered in New Orleans. The seafood restaurants really were fantastic. BBQ was heavy on the sauce. Great flavor, but reminded me a little of Memphis BBQ. Then a little 400 mile jaunt to Hill Country, to visit one of them damn northerners most Texans like to disparage. There the BBQ was based mostly on the famous Texas style dry rub. No need for heavy sauces. Melt in your mouth beef brisket. Outstanding. Canyon Lake and New Braunfels were my Hill Country destinations. One end to the other, Texas is an impressive, varied place. As crowded as Houston is, the Guadalupe Mountains in south Texas, Big Bend country, has the lowest human population per square mile of anywhere in the USA. Unfortunately, I did not explore Big Bend when I was young, now as a fat, old, retired northerner, I can no longer do the 2 weeks of hiking I would need to do to explore the largely roadless areas of Big Bend.

But don't worry, as much as I like Texas, I'll never retire there. If I end up anywhere it will either be the farm in Michigan, or somewhere in New Mexico.

Everywhere I travel in USA, I sample the local BBQ, and it has been a delight. Every region has its own unique twist on the theme of BBQ. North Carolina, South Carolina are surprisingly different from each other. Memphis and Kansas City and San Antonio are my "reference points" for some of the major differences in BBQ. Now you all, just need to get out there and travel and sample a for yourselves.

I am off topic. Oh well.
 
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Leo in N E Illinois

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On topic, I will be curious to see how the foliage of the redberry Juniper looks after a few years of the "gentle life" in a bonsai pot. It will be interesting to see if it will become tight, like a good shimpaku can do, or if it will become wispy or rangy. I will be following this thread.
 
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