Rmj, how much tree to use?

Messages
12,001
Likes
12,015
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
5-6
#82
Thanks Vance, I'll keep it in mind if I feel like I need to move it around. I did something similar once. Wrapped a jinn in wet paper towel and covered it with tinfoil. Left it for a week to give the wood time to absorb then heated with a torch through the paper and foil, steamed it. It worked but would slowly move back to where it was over time (months).
You have to keep something on the wood for a while or of course it is going to move back over time. The difference here is that you first applied moisture.
 

wireme

Masterpiece
Messages
3,074
Likes
5,950
Location
Kootenays, British Columbia
USDA Zone
3
#84
A picture or reference would make your remark much more significant and relevant. Correction, You are refering to the original RMJ?

Here's before and now on the same page. I can relate to Pots's point of view, I did spend a lot of time considering "wilder" options and it wasn't an easy decision for me either. Lucky for
me I still like what I have now just fine. image.jpg

image.jpg
Started out beautiful wild tree with much potential ended up meh.
Not ended yet man!!

But fair enough I think I pretty much am done with the rough styling for the time being. For the near future It'll probably stay much the same but get kinda combed out and prettied up a bit. Full domestication!:0
 
Last edited:
Messages
677
Likes
1,336
Location
New Mexico, zone 6b
USDA Zone
6b
#86
Started out beautiful wild tree with much potential ended up meh.
Here's before and now on the same page. I can relate to Pots's point of view, I did spend a lot of time considering "wilder" options and it wasn't an easy decision for me either. Lucky for
me I still like what I have now just fine. View attachment 146959

View attachment 146962


Not ended yet man!!

But fair enough I think I pretty much am done with the rough styling for the time being. For the near future It'll probably stay much the same but get kinda combed out and prettied up a bit. Full domestication!:0
Time to hire that bonsai bear for a re-styling!;) At this point, I think it mostly needs better-defined foliage pads and negative space. Looks healthy; keep the fertilizer going!
 

wireme

Masterpiece
Messages
3,074
Likes
5,950
Location
Kootenays, British Columbia
USDA Zone
3
#87
Time to hire that bonsai bear for a re-styling!;) At this point, I think it mostly needs better-defined foliage pads and negative space. Looks healthy; keep the fertilizer going!
Naw, fired the bear. He stopped by the other day and re-styled my truck, I didn't like it. I think he's a total hack, not artistic at all, here is his work. image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg
Just getting the fert happening now. Hired an elk to help with that. She made me up some nice solid cakes. image.jpg
Liquid applications will start this weekend, I'll try to feed lots.
 

Bonsai Nut

Administrator
Messages
7,111
Likes
10,525
Location
OC, CA
USDA Zone
10A
#88
Naw, fired the bear. He stopped by the other day and re-styled my truck, I didn't like it. I think he's a total hack, not artistic at all, here is his work.
Dude! This entire post makes me sooooo happy. My kids are growing up in Southern Cal. They have no idea. I try to tell them what it is like growing up in rural US. I might as well speak to bricks.
 
Messages
677
Likes
1,336
Location
New Mexico, zone 6b
USDA Zone
6b
#89
Naw, fired the bear. He stopped by the other day and re-styled my truck, I didn't like it. I think he's a total hack, not artistic at all, here is his work. View attachment 147174 View attachment 147175 View attachment 147176
Avant-garde artists are always misunderstood!

Just getting the fert happening now. Hired an elk to help with that. She made me up some nice solid cakes. View attachment 147180
Liquid applications will start this weekend, I'll try to feed lots.
The elk pellets don't need to be composted?
 

Bonsai Nut

Administrator
Messages
7,111
Likes
10,525
Location
OC, CA
USDA Zone
10A
#91
Ok my opinion of where you ended up. I probably would have done the exact same thing. It's not a question of "wild looking", but a question of how you capture that feeling of a large ancient tree in the wilderness. The only thing I think you are guilty of is being too enamored of your jins. I would reduce or eliminate them. They are long, straight and uninteresting. They pull the eye away from the lines of the tree. Only keep jins if they reinforce your design. Don't just keep deadwood because it is there.

treerockin.jpg

This, my friend, is a kick-ass tree :) And it is all there...
 
Last edited:

wireme

Masterpiece
Messages
3,074
Likes
5,950
Location
Kootenays, British Columbia
USDA Zone
3
#92
Avant-garde artists are always misunderstood!


The elk pellets don't need to be composted?
Avant-garde artists are always misunderstood!


The elk pellets don't need to be composted?
No. Well, I don't know!
I can say that I've used elk, deer and llama pellets like this on many trees over many years, at the least it doesn't seem to hurt. I've even mixed them right into the soil fresh. Upon repotting they're still there full of roots. They may not do much, they get a pretty hard skin on them on the surface, a year later they usually still look exactly the same.I like to think they are awesome for the trees just picked up off the ground and applied but of course I really have no idea.
 
Messages
677
Likes
1,336
Location
New Mexico, zone 6b
USDA Zone
6b
#94
No. Well, I don't know!
I can say that I've used elk, deer and llama pellets like this on many trees over many years, at the least it doesn't seem to hurt. I've even mixed them right into the soil fresh. Upon repotting they're still there full of roots. They may not do much, they get a pretty hard skin on them on the surface, a year later they usually still look exactly the same.I like to think they are awesome for the trees just picked up off the ground and applied but of course I really have no idea.
"Full of roots" is a pretty good affirmation.
 

wireme

Masterpiece
Messages
3,074
Likes
5,950
Location
Kootenays, British Columbia
USDA Zone
3
#95
Ok my opinion of where you ended up. I probably would have done the exact same thing. It's not a question of "wild looking", but a question of how you capture that feeling of a large ancient tree in the wilderness. The only thing I think you are guilty of is being too enamored of your jins. I would reduce or eliminate them. They are long, straight and uninteresting. They pull the eye away from the lines of the tree. Only keep jins if they reinforce your design. Don't just keep deadwood because it is there.

View attachment 147195

This, my friend, is a kick-ass tree :) And it is all there...

Thanks for your thoughts, I appreciate it. And the virtual, looks pretty good. The thing about the jinns to remember is that you guys are looking at photos and in 2d. The lower one especially has a lot going on that doesn't show in a pic. I'm not so opposed to shortening or editing bits of some of them but not yet, maybe someday. You can see the chop is still unworked too, that still needs carving and shari below it. The main descending branch also need a bit more movement. I thought I had it but looked again and saw a way to improve. Won't change a lot in 2d but a little, It's gonna bug me now if I don't do it.
 

M. Frary

Bonsai Godzilla
Messages
12,403
Likes
17,527
Location
Mio Michigan
USDA Zone
4
#97
Dude! This entire post makes me sooooo happy. My kids are growing up in Southern Cal. They have no idea. I try to tell them what it is like growing up in rural US. I might as well speak to bricks.
Get out there!
It isn't so bad.
You might even see a fox.
 

Bonsai Nut

Administrator
Messages
7,111
Likes
10,525
Location
OC, CA
USDA Zone
10A
#99
Get out there!
It isn't so bad.
You might even see a fox.
LOL I get out all the time - it's my KIDS I'm worried about.

I even DID see a red fox here this Spring while I was up in the mountains. I got to call the sighting into the Ranger station - they aren't known to live this far south. Grey foxes are typically what we will see.