So just chopped&potted my 1st *large* Podocarpus yamadori (many pics in-thread!), hoping for any advice on aftercare!!

SU2

Omono
Messages
1,291
Reaction score
357
Location
FL (Tampa area / Gulf-Coast)
USDA Zone
9b
I was driving-home when I spotted it, these are VERY hard to find I've been seeking one for half a decade now w/o luck, seems it was ~an hour of being curbside the rootball's edge was dry but interior still had some moisture, was a good size:
1 podocarpus at take home.jpg
2 podocarpus at first with tap-root and fine roots.jpg

I chopped the top&bottom, leaving some "extra/sacrificial height" on the shoots for possible die-back:
3 - top and bottom cut, with top cuts being conservative for die-back.jpg

and potted-up in my usual mix, very free-draining but rich:
4 - loose-draining mix in high-drain container.jpg (I used a mix of "orchid mix" type mixture ~70%, and 30% perlite, to bring it to the top / to surround the rootball, then top-dressed with "fortified mulching" and some very rich humus from an old&active raised bed of mine, can smell the myco from feet away lol)

I'm worried of the scale-insects (or soot-mold?) that I'm seeing as black/darkened spots all over the foliage... I do like the 2 main trunks (I suspect it was originally a 5 specimen 'bundle' that fused, there's 2 'main' thickest trunks and a 3rd that I suspect I may keep, then a few thinner ones in the back that'll be removed I just figured it'd help to refrain for now, less trauma / wounding yknow!)
5 - in container, twin-trunked podocarpus at minimum although a few more, smaller trunks on rear.jpg
^3rd "real trunk" is peering-out between the 2 main trunks, here's a couple shots that really show those "other trunks" in the rear:
6 - of the 3 or 4 "rear trunks", I suspect only the largest will be kept.jpg7 - side view showing the 2 main trunks, 3rd & largest rear trunk, plus smaller rear trunks.jpg


I didn't use IBA, and I did seal the wounds (after 24hrs) with a quick-dry caulking (my go-to for wound dressings) 8 - top-down view, cuts sealed, only the 3 'prominent' trunks really show, am considering the ...jpg
^You can see how those tiny rear limbs are hardly visible, they all got some caulking too, figure I'll remove them if/once it's in active growth!


Any advice/tips would be greatly appreciated, realllllly wanna keep this guy, I have success (usually) collecting small seedling / whip sized Podo's but think I have 1 larger Podo collection under my belt (failed, and was way closer to when I started than to now, all I do is collect heck I finally have my Live Oak and a Loropetalum that've made it past root-prunings, want any & all advantages with this Podo, am:

1 - keeping him in a spot where he just gets a lil filtered afternoon light, then indirect-only from 12.30p onwards
2 - low-wind location, and am misting the crown when I water the garden (2-4x/day avg)
3 - didn't apply any ferts or anything, but my top-dressing is from a very rich, established bed it's gotta be 50% myco hyphae's by weight lol, that's why there's dead roots as part of top-dressing is because it's just some handfuls from that bed I 'seed' all new containers this way & it seems to be going well enough :D

I don't know if I should use my mister bottle and/or setup more wind screening. I took pains to ensure the growing-tips / apical buds of the highest (remaining) shoots of all limbs, in fact the apical buds of all remaining shoots, were left intact...I do however "thin out" the Podo after doing the trunk-chops, removing about 1/5th of the shoots (just clean nips with knob cutter)

Thanks a TON for any advice on this one!!
 

RKMcGinnis

Mame
Messages
113
Reaction score
80
Location
Canton, Georgia
USDA Zone
7a
Looks like it was healthy. You did a lot of work will be interesting to see how it recuperates. Seems like you are taking good care of it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SU2
Messages
270
Reaction score
317
Location
Hildale, UT, USA
USDA Zone
7a
Nice! Looks a bit like mine. I remember reading someplace that in the landscape, transplant shock is reduced with podocarpus by increasing watering significantly. Not sure if the same applies in a container, though...
 
  • Like
Reactions: SU2

SU2

Omono
Messages
1,291
Reaction score
357
Location
FL (Tampa area / Gulf-Coast)
USDA Zone
9b
Looks like it was healthy. You did a lot of work will be interesting to see how it recuperates. Seems like you are taking good care of it.
Thanks! Gotta say I'm more-than just a lil nervous, having this thing survive with that trunk & the rootplate cut the way it was would just be a dream for me I have yearned for one of these for ages (think I mentioned I'd broken down and just started seedlings, have several that I figured I'd just start working as-bonsai in several years once they thickened, so finally >5yrs of looking and finally find a good sized Podo!)

You assess it as healthy- I did too- but my biggest reservation was the black scale insects, the overall vigor of the specimen didn't seem affected yet but I don't know how quickly scale bugs can take-over I have little/no experience with them....I do know of yard-grown Podo's that have this black scale, and have had it for years, they don't seem so lush/vigorous but they survive..

Will certainly update, this "Buddhist Pine" Podo will likely become one of my favorite specimen if it makes it :D

[PS- physical agitation seems to work for the black-scale-insects or sooty-mold whatever that stuff is, if I have the hose misting while massaging foliage it does "clean it up"! Don't wanna do the entire crown but did clean some areas up ;D ]
 

SU2

Omono
Messages
1,291
Reaction score
357
Location
FL (Tampa area / Gulf-Coast)
USDA Zone
9b
Nice! Looks a bit like mine. I remember reading someplace that in the landscape, transplant shock is reduced with podocarpus by increasing watering significantly. Not sure if the same applies in a container, though...
This is cool to hear, thanks a TON for taking the time to post!! I have a verrry rapid-drain mixture, wasn't sure if a bit dry, or bit wet, was smarter, so aimed to make the soil one that would always be moist AND always have plenty of aeration so it's a "no fines" mix (not many 'mediums' either it's a "large particle orchid mix" basically), and was watering it by:
- crown: misted with moderate intensity 2-4x/day (ie whenever I'm hosing-down the whole garden)
- substrate: 2x/3d seems what this substrate & location require for properly-wetted substrate, and I use rainwater for this ;)

Hearing you say that makes me want to improve the water I'm giving it, am GG setup one of the 5gal's with rainwater plus a handful of my super-myco soil, and a handful of ground-up sphagnum, to let it sit and just begin getting the Podo's water from there ;D Had used a good tight handful (more like 2 actually:p )of sphagnum in my top-dressings so that waterings "pull down" the goodies in it but like the idea of fortified water :D
 
Messages
270
Reaction score
317
Location
Hildale, UT, USA
USDA Zone
7a
am GG setup one of the 5gal's with rainwater plus a handful of my super-myco soil, and a handful of ground-up sphagnum, to let it sit and just begin getting the Podo's water from there ;D Had used a good tight handful (more like 2 actually:p )of sphagnum in my top-dressings so that waterings "pull down" the goodies in it but like the idea of fortified water :D

Wow, I think that is three things I have never heard of in one post.

What is a "GG setup"?

"Super-myco soil"...I am assuming this is soil inoculated with mycorrhizae? So you make kind of a tea for watering with?

And then, sort of like the above, it sounds like you use water infused with sphagnum moss? Can you share a link with more info on this? I could not find anything with some brief Google research.

Thanks!
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom