You be the Judge

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#81
When the bonsai “breaks the edge” of the scroll, it is supposed to only break the line of the edge, not the artwork itself.
Outside of Japanese display rules, the look of the tree “placing” itself in the scenery image with the slight overlap is growing on me.
 

Brian Van Fleet

Imperial Masterpiece
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#82
Now that it’s clear anyone can jump in and win this thing, it’s really got me thinking about my entry next year. My kid is coloring the scroll, and I have the accent piece nailed down. I mean, who doesn’t look at Bunzan pots and think Skittles?
C12627F2-B19B-4DF4-95F3-74DB434625E5.jpeg
Maybe we need an online “most absurd display” contest using bastardized traditional elements. Anyone in?
 
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#84
You really have to respect the individual who has spent significant resources, but mostly their time on learning how to craft a display. It is clear in the entire outline and structure. That is why I would rate #4 quite high.

My personal critique of display #4.
I am assuming this is a deciduous, but then again I am not the strongest in knowledge of plants. If so, this is a Gyou no Shin 行の真 (Semi Formal plant in a Formal Styling). I am going to rate this styling as a Shakkan...Pot is matched. Maybe it is just the camera angle, but it seems the pot is placed slightly left of center, which is absolutely correct. This helps to accentuate the flow of the display, elongating the invisible triangle between the three objects.
1. Criticisms of the display are minor, but Ume blossoming is an early spring indicator, so if this is a deciduous tree, then it would be better to display a tree that is just starting to develop leaf buds to be congruent. (If it is a broadleaf evergreen, then ignore this and scratch the entire first paragraph, as it would be incorrect.)
2. The stand for the kusamono feels a bit too tall and formal to my eye.

Seriously, why isn't Smoke asked to be the judges of these events....
 
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#85
My personal thought. You picked a wonderful tree, cute accent plant and a piece of art Loved by someone important to you.
 

M. Frary

Bonsai Godzilla
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#86
Maybe its time for Mr. Hanky?
Maybe if I were to try to rate these.
I admit I don't know shit about displaying a tree.
Have never done it and if I do this year or will be just the tree.
I have no scroll.
I have no stand.
I have no accent plant.
I wouldn't know what to do with any of these except the stand.
You put the tree on that I think.
I've been to shows exactly 4 times.
Like I said,I don't know shit nor will I try to act like I do when it comes to displays.
But.
From these threads of yours I am learning enough to maybe be able to hash something together in the future.
 

Adair M

Imperial Masterpiece
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#87
Maybe if I were to try to rate these.
I admit I don't know shit about displaying a tree.
Have never done it and if I do this year or will be just the tree.
I have no scroll.
I have no stand.
I have no accent plant.
I wouldn't know what to do with any of these except the stand.
You put the tree on that I think.
I've been to shows exactly 4 times.
Like I said,I don't know shit nor will I try to act like I do when it comes to displays.
But.
From these threads of yours I am learning enough to maybe be able to hash something together in the future.
Well, then, it’s time you did!

Mike, we all go thru this. At first, it’s all about the tree. Pots don’t really matter as long as they’re basicly the right size and shape. Glazed? Unglazed? Who cares!

Eventually, though, as we see more and more displays and pictures, we begin to notice how some tree/pot combinations look better than others. How the right pot can enhance the image of the tree. (Conversely, we start to see how poor combinations can work against each other!)

When matched well, the tree and pot together can make the image look better than each would look on its own. I suppose that’s why “Bonsai” references both the tree and a pot, rather than translating down to “small tree”.

Once your eye has developed to this point, then adding the display table and accent plant is a natural progression.

Ask Vance! He’ll explain it to ya!
 
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#88
Number #3 is the type of display I love. It incorporates traditional rules with native motifs.

As everyone else has stated the biggest problem with this display is too many elements for the amount of space provided. I invite you to look at a resource I wrote in defining the display space. https://bonsainut.com/resources/defining-the-display-space.1
Compare the pictures. In both of those pictures, the Toko areas are twice as large, but they use smaller objects to display.
Bigger is not always better, and more is sometimes less....

If they had dropped the kusamono....and moved accent of Rocky Mountain Bighorn sheep over to the left more, this would have been the winner in my book. Waterfall anticipates the upcoming summer season.
 
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#89
Thoughts on display number 2.

Very good coordination of elements, but execution in placement seems a little off.
1. I can see how you would want to place this bonsai on the right hand side to display..but the
branches on the right seem to dictate the flow.
2. The kusamono is supposed to act as the stopping point for the display, but because the flower is facing away from the tree does not feel like it does that.
3. I do not know if many of you noticed, but almost all of the scrolls are not centered in these displays. The only one that seems to be centered correctly is number 4. This one has the most pronounced off centered placement which makes the display feel unbalanced.

Small changes I would do to this display.
1. Hang the kakejiku in the center of the display space.
2. Display the tree on the left hand side to accentutate the flow of the branches on the right hand side.
3. Place the Shoku a little more to the left and place the pot slightly to the right of center.
4. Have the flower of the accent piece to point back in toward the bonsai rather than away.
 
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#90
Before I critique number 1, I will disclose that I made the scroll (did not do the painting)....for this display.

Sometimes when I hear bonsai artists critiquing scrolls, I just need to bite my tongue. Everyone has a right to their opinion...
but it does not mean their opinion is correct.
Usually when I make a custom scroll for a bonsai display I would ask the following questions.
1. What species of tree and what styling will the tree have?
2. Will the tree sit on the right or left side. (to determine flow)?
3. What season or geographical location are you trying to communicate?
4. What is the size (height, width and depth) of the display space?
5. What is the dimension of the artwork?
6. What pot, stand and accent will you use?

Knowing these little details would help me to create the best scroll for the display.

Now, quick question...What is the most suitable scroll style for bonsai display? Can you name it?
Is this scroll a Yokojiku scroll?

As others have said the table is too large for the tree....With a smaller table, I would have rated this display very high.
The flow is very good for this installation as well.
 
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#92
Now that it’s clear anyone can jump in and win this thing, it’s really got me thinking about my entry next year. My kid is coloring the scroll, and I have the accent piece nailed down. I mean, who doesn’t look at Bunzan pots and think Skittles?
View attachment 187917
Maybe we need an online “most absurd display” contest using bastardized traditional elements. Anyone in?
Is this happening yet? I'd be all up for it! Nice accent!
 
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#93
No it is a Sou (Maru Hyougu). I "think" it is the most used Japanese Hyougushi. Just from what I see, no expert for certain :p

Grimmy
A yokojiku scroll is one in which the width is wider than the length. A tatejiku scroll is one where the length is longer than the width.
Although the painting is very wide, this is definitely a tatejiku scroll.

Yeah! You got it right it is a Maru Hyougu format scroll....Probably more correctly Sou no Sou (most informal) format. This makes me happy that some have listened to what I wrote.:cool:
 

GrimLore

Imperial Masterpiece
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#94
A yokojiku scroll is one in which the width is wider than the length. A tatejiku scroll is one where the length is longer than the width.
Although the painting is very wide, this is definitely a tatejiku scroll.
Thank you for that explanation. It is a little difficult for me to sometimes try and decipher what I see written online, probably poor English translations so I for one appreciate when you share knowledge in an understandable fashion :)

Grimmy
 
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#97
6-4-3
I haven't read the rest of the thread yet- I didn't want it to alter my opinion.
I will go back and read it now.
I love 6- the background really enhances the set up well.
 
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#98

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